Monday, February 17, 2014

My Gangsta Glock - How I Got It, Lost It, and Got It Back


Sam's Gangsta Glock 26, with MNPD theft report

The Glock 26 #Glock26 was released in the US in 1994, and I was one of the first in line (shocker, I know).   I was thrilled to have a full power 9mm pistol in a compact package with Glock reliability.

The Glock 26 was a premier "Pocket Rocket", an unintended consequence of the 1994 Omnibus Crime Bill which banned the manufacture of magazines capable of holding more than ten rounds for civilian sale.

Glock and other manufacturers realized that if the magazine's couldn't hold more than ten rounds, the guns could be smaller!  And an entire category of centerfire, subcompact firearms with doublestack magazines, all scaled down from full size sidearms, became available.

I quickly became attached to my Glock 26, and it became my vehicle gun.  I kept it in a 35mm camera case, which did not seem out of place in 1994.

On July 12, 1996, I parked my truck at Sixth and Church in Nashville and returned to find a broken window and a missing camera case.  And a missing Glock 26.  I filed a police report with Metropolitan Nashville Police Department.  At the time of loss, the gun was loaded with eleven rounds of Corbon 124gr jacketed hollow points in a ten round magazine with a Pearce grip extension.

I bought a replacement Glock 26, and chocked my loss up to bad luck.

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Four years later, I received a call from Officer Dave of MNPD.  It went something like this:

"Mr. Shallenberger, this is Officer Dave of MNPD and I think I have something that belongs to you"

"Is it a Glock 26?"

"Yes."

"Great!  How did you find it?"

"Someone killed ten people with it."

"OK, when can I get it back."

"Ha.  Just kidding about the ten people.  I'll check with the DA and we can probably release it soon."

When I picked it up, they wouldn't let me have the ammo.  The gun was clean, heavily over-oiled, and was returned with the original magazine.  They discarded seven rounds of Corbon 124gr jacketed hollow points.  I don't believe it was fired four times, rather, I believe it was loaded and unloaded frequently with an occasional lost round.

Officer Dave explained the recovery:

"We got a tip that a felon was in possession of a handgun, from his ex-girlfriend.  So when we spotted the guy at Mapco, we questioned him.  He did not have the gun.  We pulled the security film from the Mapco and saw him stash the gun in the potato chips.  We went back in and there it was, next to the Doritos.  So we booked him as a felon in possession."

Recently, I had Glock install metal night sights and replace every non-serialized part with new.  After twenty years of ownership, and sixteen years of possession, it remains my favorite.

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